Law Absolute - Recruitment specialists

Ways to alleviate nerves before an interview

13th October 2014

Follow this guide to help keep you calm before an interview

Shaky voice, sweaty palms, dry mouth, bouncing knees and talking too fast are all common signs that an interviewee is very nervous. Suffering from pre-interview nerves is all too common and can often affect whether your interview is a successful one or a disaster.

If you often get nervous before an interview or have an interview coming up then you should check out the following tips to help you get rid of those pre-interview jitters.

Take a bath the night beforeTake a bath the night before

To be at your peak you need a good night’s sleep, but it is often difficult to sleep the night before an interview as so many thoughts are rushing through your head.

So if you are going to interviews for in-house legal jobs in London or for other lawyer jobs and need to relax the night before, then a soothing warm bath with some oils will calm your body and mind before the big day.

Lay in the bath for at least 10-15 minutes to let the bath oils work their undoubted magic.

RehearseRehearse

On the morning of the interview consider the message that you want to get across and outline points that you want to tell your potential employer during the interview. For example, if you have applied for new solicitor jobs and are preparing for interviews you need to highlight your previous experience in talking to the interviewer.

An article on the Career Nook website says, “Ask a friend or relative to pretend to interview you, giving you a chance to come up with answers that feel good and comfortable.”

Arrive early

Arrive earlyThe worse possible scenario is for you to be late to the interview, so be sure to leave your home in plenty of time, factoring in any possible traffic queues or other delays.

Arriving early also means that you can relax ahead of the interview and be able to gather your thoughts.

If you are beginning to feel hot and bothered before the interview then you will have time to calm your nerves before it takes place. This article on the Telegraph says that putting cold water over your wrists and behind your ears will refresh you ahead of your interview as well.

Power Posing

We can hear you ask: what is Power Posing? It is a 2-minute body language trick that a recent study has found can lead to significant increases in testosterone and decreases in cortisol, the stress hormone.

Another study found that high-power posers were commonly chosen by the interviewers as hiring material.

So if you get a chance, either at home or before the interview when you are alone, try out power posing and be like a real-life Superman for a couple of minutes.

To find out more about the importance of body language, watch the below video on the subject.

Breathing techniquesBreathing techniques

When you are stressed your breathing tends to quicken, which can affect your voice and body language.

In an interview this can have a detrimental impact and it is therefore worth trying different exercises to control your breathing.

There are a number of easy-to-use breathing exercises that you can try before an interview such as the four-seven-eight breathing exercises. These exercises are great to try out before your interview as they calm your mind, regulate your breathing and even out your emotions.

There are other jobs available- so don’t panic

There are other jobs availableIf interviewees think that they have put all their eggs in one basket then nerves may get the better of them and it could ruin their chances of succeeding in the interview process. Going into a job interview with the mind-set that ‘if you don’t get this job then there are more opportunities still out there waiting for you’ will not only help with your nerves, but can improve your chances of getting the job that you are going for.

After your interview why not do something you enjoy; go for a walk, play football with your friends or watch a movie to prevent you from thinking about how the interview went.

Image Credit: BlueSkyImage (Shutterstock.com), Bob Peters (flickr.com), Kzenon (Shutterstock.com), Nejron Photo (Shutterstock.com), martinak15 (flickr.com), Daniel Novta (flickr.com)