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More recruitment companies offering staff unlimited holiday

15th August 2017

Beach on Crete

A new article published by a recruitment magazine has claimed that many more companies within the sector are offering unlimited holiday to new recruits – and warns of the consequences for those who are not doing so.

The piece quotes Office for National Statistics figures which state that British people are now taking the equivalent of 68% more holidays than they were 20 years ago, and argues that companies need to respect this trend if they are to recruit and retain high value employees.

One of the first recruitment agencies to have taken up this somewhat controversial position is Expand Executive Search, and their CEO Samantha Maxwell-Reed claims that it has had a transformative effect on both the morale of workers and the company’s bottom line.

Maxwell-Reed justified her agency’s stance by stating “we are confident that high performance is so ingrained in Expand’s culture that we can trust the team to act responsibly”, also explaining that sales have grown by 52%, sickness days halved, and staff turnover decreased by 10% since unlimited holiday was introduced. Interestingly, the CEO also notes that the average annual leave taken has only risen by three days, from 25 to 28.

Many yet to be convinced

The initiative is being seen by some as pivotal when it comes to sourcing talent such as recruiters tasked with filling vacancies for senior lawyer jobs in London.

Recruiters Charlton Morris’s managing director, Andy Shatwell, said that “the danger of companies not treating employees like adults is that ultimately they will become frustrated and move on, top performers in particular”.

However, it may not come as a surprise to learn that not everyone who was questioned agreed that unlimited holidays are the future. Elliott Manning of Kayman Recruitment believes that long and spontaneous blocks of annual leave could have a damaging effect on the performance of sales professionals: “If a recruiter takes three or four weeks off it’s going to affect their pipeline and ultimately over a three-month period of the year, that’s going to affect business…I just don’t think it sits well in a sales-based role.”

Image Credit: Jaf-Photo